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Inventions that are only possible due to use of high technology

countofmontecristo's Avatargold

Does anyone know of any inventions that were only possible due to the invention of other high technologies such as 3D printing? Besides my own. that is.

I'm curious how the patent office is going to handle this incoming wave of patent applications that rely exclusively on 3D printed type of mfg.  For instance I have some inventions right now, that are simply not possible with existing mfg. methods and processes, excluding 3D printed, that is.   SLA, SLS and FDM printing technologies are changing the world as I type this.

What an fascinating time to be alive!

Robert Pontius
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chappy75's Avatargold

Yes, I concur. I am working on a product now that I am trying to figure out a manufacturing method that is NOT 3D printed, no luck so far. I was a panelist for a french 3d printing company who has patents on the metal printing alloys. Huge application in Medical.

There is an entire industry that is about to bust out of it's seams when these patents start going through. It is exciting, I agree!

Ralph Machesky
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kimmyk's Avatargold

I don't know if you would included these, but there are a host of medical products that use laser technology, energetics, ultrasound, and light waves for various diagnostic and therapeutic functions... not to mention all the products that morphed from another industry over to medical (such as drill bits from oil rigs that were transformed to cut through blockages in blood vessels.)  Exciting times, indeed!

Ralph Machesky
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countofmontecristo's Avatargold

@Kim L-

Great examples but I meant more towards the mfg side. Don't forget many of those technologies were derived from Military or NASA applications as well.  What I was referring to are inventions or objects that cannot be produced 'without the use of' 3D printing.

Mfg with existing machines (CNC, lathe, injection molding) have their limits and using advanced technologies of 3D printing allows you to create inventions that simply are not possible any other way.  The objects are simply too intricate or impossibly shaped.

As James eluded to, medical is about to set out on a whole new frontier including 'printing' out body parts and organs, which they have already started doing. I love it when we can harness these exotic technologies to do good things, that instill hope in our cloudy future.

I'm thinking there are going to be a whole bunch of patent applications that cite the use of 3D printing as a sub claim to regular claims.   (wink,wink, nudge,nudge, say no more)  : )

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allig's Avatarg8_badge

Indeed, bioengineering can print out structural type organs such as trachea and bladders, the kinds of organs that play a more passive/reservoir type function.  They're still a ways off from being able to print active organs like a heart or kidney, but the first successful printed bladder was transplanted back in 2001.  

Part of the obstacle is lack of blood vessel networks in printed tissues, another is the lack of cultivation in a cell-signaling environment in which a printed organ can, for lack of a better term, be "socialized" to its environment.  

As to vessel networks, exciting studies are being done on turning plant tissue such as spinach leaves that have veins into vessel networks that can be grafted over printed organs and provide blood flow through the veins.  Pretty neat!  

Biomedical engineering is a hot field right now!

Ralph Machesky
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countofmontecristo's Avatargold

@Alli G

These guys make one of the very best SLA type printers, but also make one of the better Bio-medical plotters. Very cool stuff indeed.  It's going to be an exciting future if we don't blow ourselves up, first.

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inovate's Avataree_badge

Waters may be back, before we can blow ourselves up. But as a reply to your original question...Yes , moving at faster vibes...is pretty cool.

Ralph Machesky
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psinventor's Avatargold

I have invented a 3D printable water activated 15 volt battery.

So imagine being able to print out a power source from anywhere.  My Cool Inventions Radio Jim Siegrist  http://www.americastalkradionetwork.com/MCI_072...

Ralph Machesky
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countofmontecristo's Avatargold

Jim that concept is way cool, no doubt about it.  And didn't you say NASA has looked at it?

That's pretty awesome in itself! I would love to hear more about it, do you have a website for it? The specs on it would be nice- Mah for instance or usable temp range.

I guess my next question is: can someone build your battery *without* the aid of any 3D printing whatsoever?  That's the kicker here: Some inventions simply *cannot* be possible without the aid of 3D printing technology.

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countofmontecristo's Avatargold

@Jim-

Here's one DIY 3D Printed battery I found, but it looks very weak (uses vinegar and zinc) but enough to power LED light. Also found some others very simliar.

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psinventor's Avatargold

My battery is a thin paper strip.  You need about 2.85 volts to just turn on a LED. The trick is raising the voltage, amperage and extending the time. 

A few years ago I made over 200 volts on my kitchen counter with one prototype. Later I was able to power an LED for 45 days. 

In another thread I talked about inventors building their own prototypes and discovery. The rebuilding is the growth curve. It's also the reason we should not make filing the patent the goal because things change and level up as you rebuild.

     I have made these things over and over in thousands of different confiurations to extract where I am today with it.

    One of the most exciting moments I had was the first time I actually electrocuted my self from my own creation.  The skin on my fingers where burnt and I was happy about it .

Ralph Machesky
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tesladog's Avatargold

Here's how it's effecting the sculpture world. Check out his presentation on the subject. Cool stuff.

http://www.joshharker.com/

Ralph Machesky
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countofmontecristo's Avatargold

Wow. Some great examples that are only possible due to 3D printing, Patric!

I'm 99% certain you cannot injection mold or form that cruise ship in that manner, with that level of detail, in any other way. 

This also brings up a quandry; If some items can only be created or produced by means of 3D printing technologies, that may inhibit the chances of being mass-produced!  For the time being anyways...

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rogerbrown's Avatargold

What I see happening is most homes will have their own 3D printer and you just purchase the product online and they send the specs to your machine and it prints it out at your location. No shipping or time delay in getting your purchase. Once you buy the product you can print it out to scale or select your own scale to the capabilities of your printer.

Look at this 3D printed house

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUdnrtnjT5Q

Or these 17 items

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSu19nz7NlE

Ralph Machesky
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countofmontecristo's Avatargold

Roger-

I see that at one point down the road, but until we have nano particle material harvesting, it won't be for a while.  People will still need 'resources' or materials to feed the complex printers. I can see it now-  (HONEY, CAN YOU PULL UP THE ORDER PAGE? THE PRINTER IS OUT OF PLASTIC AGAIN!)

Speaking of complex, take a look at how 3D printing is changing the foundry and casting worlds with parts that simply cannot be CNC machined or otherwise created.

Next stop- Transparent Aluminum...I'll be ready. : )

Patric J
Patric J
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gadgetmanken's Avatargold

I ran across this one the other day.

https://youtu.be/drD416THU7Y

I also saw where they have 3D printed igloos out of expanding foam.

Ralph Machesky
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tesladog's Avatargold

Very cool, Kenneth. Looks like we may not have to troll the asteroid belt for monopoles after all...

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countofmontecristo's Avatargold

My battery is a thin paper strip. You need about 2.85 volts to just turn on a LED. The trick is raising the voltage, amperage and extending the time.

A few years ago I made over 200 volts on my kitchen counter with one prototype. Later I was able to power an LED for 45 days.

In another thread I talked about inventors building their own prototypes and discovery. The rebuilding is the growth curve. It's also the reason we should not make filing the patent the goal because things change and level up as you rebuild.

I have made these things over and over in thousands of different configurations to extract where I am today with it.

One of the most exciting moments I had was the first time I actually electrocuted my self from my own creation. The skin on my fingers where burnt and I was happy about it .


I wanted people to see this again- that is very impressive, Jim!  I'm still trying to figure out why EN has not jumped all over this as well.  What's up with that?

The only other water battery I know of, that works fairly simply is this copper/magnesium one.  Nothing that great, just simple.  Yours sounds even simpler, which leads me to think it is PH-based.   Build a water battery that also utilizes magnets and you've got a deal!


Charlie Lumsden
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inovate's Avataree_badge

Ralph, I agree the simplicity of Jim's water candle is amazing, and use with the programmable magnets, Kenneth point out could probably build a Coral castle.

As far as military using these techs on a large scale, might actually mess with the earth,s magnetic field. Poof, no more gravitational pull. Canadian geese in Florida?

Ralph Machesky
Ralph Machesky
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