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Lesson # 4 Just because YOU want it, does not make it Happen

rogerbrown's Avatargold

This goes to everyone that has a product idea. Add to the list.

1. Just because you love it and can see it in every home in the U.S. does not make it a reality.

2. Just because your friends and family loves it does not mean it is a million dollar idea.

3, Just because you have a patent does not mean its marketable.

4. Just because you can make it cheaply does not mean a company HAS to sell it.

5. Just because you sent it special delevery to a company does not mean they will open it right away or that they will love it.

6. Just because YOU KNOW it would fit well with the companies line of prodcts does not mean they will.

7. Just because you spent a lot of money having a prototype made, paid a lot for a patent, paid more to shoot a video, paid a marketing company for a marketing analysis and are in debt over your head does not mean a company has to take that into account when they review your idea.

8. Just because you have been busting your butt for the past 3 years on this product does not make it marketable.

9. Just because YOU want it to happen you can’t force consumers to like your product and buy it.

10. Just because you got rejected does not mean THEY are stupid.

11. Just because there are 265 million people in the U.S. does not mean you put in your sell sheet that all 265 million people will throw away their current (perfectly working) product to buy your product.

12. Just because you don’t understand WHY, people will buy things you think are stupid and useless over yours.

http://www.rogerbrown.net

gerrold winston Cartwright
paul ortega
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cowbell's Avatarg8_badge

Nice! Should be required reading for all inventors.
Thx

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sleepyhead's Avatar

Amen.

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zabber's Avatar

Yup, this is a great list! I will add one more

13. Having a negative attitude and blaming everyone for the non success of your product isn’t productive. YOU have to be the one to pursue your own dreams and be persistent and try try again.

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mredsasyshi1's Avatargold

Hmmm…

14. If rejected don’t tell them “I will take my product to your competitor and then you’ll loose all the business it would have brought in”

and then have the balls to say “Do you want to rethink your rejection now?”

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rogerbrown's Avatargold

Great additions. Lets keep the “Just Because” going

http://www.rogerbrown.net

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rogerbrown's Avatargold

15. Just Because you called the company and left a message does not mean they have to call you back.

16. Just Because you sent them your prototype unsolicted does not mean they have to pay for return postage.

17. Just Because a company has the capabilities to make your product does not mean they have too.

18. Just Because you don’t want to do any of the boring research does not mean a similar or better product than yours does not exist.

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rogerbrown's Avatargold

19. Just Because you spent $10,000 on a prototype and a patent does not mean you will make your money back.

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kimoracay's Avatar

Just because you have 10 products out there does not mean one will get selected to be marketed.

Not sure if this is a good one, but I tried. lol

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kimoracay's Avatar

LOL

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rogerbrown's Avatargold

Just Because you have hundreds of ideas daily does not mean they are any good.

Just Because you do everything right in your presentation does not mean the company will like it.

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pegman's Avatar

Just because you paid good money for a service does not mean that you will get good service.

Just because you see a brick wall does not mean that you have to hit it.

Just because someone doesn’t think you can possibly succeed does not mean you shouldn’t try.

Drew Hudgins
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rogerbrown's Avatargold

Just Because you have a lot of ideas does not mean everyone of them or any of them will make it to market.
Just Because you don’t see it on HSN and QVC does not mean it does not exist.

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countofmontecristo's Avatargold

1. Just because a company turns you down doesn’t mean they didn’t like your product. ALL companies have yearly budgets and they may be ‘broke’ until the next fiscal year rolls around. Fact.

2. Just because one company says ‘No thanks’ doesn’t mean they all will. It is really a matter of timing. Don’t think so? Read number one again. Timing is everything Always.

3. Just becuase you have the invented a ‘better mousetrap’ doesn’t mean the world is ready for it. Maybe they like mice now. Again timing…

4. Just because you think you have finally invented ‘Cold Fusion’ don’t even think you will own that. Many out there are in fact, working against you. It’s sometimes better if you don’t know who…

5. Just becuase you invented or thought of it first doesn’t mean you will ever make money from it. You have to fight for what’s yours…it’s not coming to you. Ever.

6. Just because your friends, neighbors and that old lady down the street tell you your invention is ‘great’ doesn’t mean it is. You need REAL unbiased (read: not invention submission corp)opinions of your idea or product. Experts are the best for that reason.

7. Just because company ‘X’ will sign an NDA (theirs) doesn’t always mean it’s in your best interests. That’s what good lawyers are for. Get them involved. Early.

8. Just because your lawyer wrote the world’s best abstract, detailed description and cross references, did they write the best claims. Claims count. The other stuff is frosting.

9. Just because because someone says “You can trust me” doesn’t mean you should. Use the military analogy of weapons destruction- Trust, but verify.

10. Just because you think the road will be narrow and fast it never is. It is wide and clogged with traffic. Always. Bridge out ahead, BTW.

11. Just because you have invented the world’s greatest widget…don’t quit your day job. Even if your backers tell you “money is no object” and they throw barrels of money at you. Money is THE object!

I’ve got hundreds more of these, and they will be in my upcoming book. : )

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rogerbrown's Avatargold

Just Because you signed a contract with a company does not automatically mean you will be rich. It still has to sell to the consumer.

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hey_holly_sunshine's Avatar

Just because the odds are against you, it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try.

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rogerbrown's Avatargold

Just Because you think the long story of how you came up with your product is interesting does not mean you have to add it to your presentation to the company.

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kabuj's Avataree_badge

Just because you paid $25 to submit, does not mean EN owes you a thesis on why it got eliminated. :-)

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debraw1's Avatar

Here is one. A friend of mine showed us a product she invented. After a few minutes of studying her idea, I knew I would never use her product. I thought it would not succeed past our meeting. That was 15 years ago. Sara Blakely has been very successful with Spanx. Just because people don’t like your idea does not mean it will not be successful.

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jeffthirtyacre's Avatar

I still don’t get spanx. Very interesting that you saw them before they hit the big time though.

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joseph's Avatar

Just because your mother says your baby is beautiful doesn’t mean the world agrees.

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snattlerake's Avatar

Just because all of the above happens doesn’t mean the some guy in China can’t steal it and produce it for fractions of a cent and make billions on your idea bootlegging it.

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goodolbakeshop's Avatarname search

Just because you are certain that EN is going to set a new precedent by moving that new submission you sent in last night to G8 by the time you wake up doesn’t mean that this delusion’s ending is any different than the last submission’s was. haha

And that, my peers IS the insanity we call inventing. Ain’t it a blast?!

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let-them-fly's Avatar

Time to BUMP this great thread JUST BECAUSE there are valuable lessons to be gleaned therein!

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1cheleno's Avatar

Personally I don’t like this post. I would add “just because all of the above may be true, it doesn’t mean your idea/invention should be abandoned!” I love reading about inventors and other creative people whose ideas were shot down only to have them be very successful. J K Rowling comes to mind, she is worth a cool billion. Not bad for someone whose idea for a kid’s book was never abandoned despite all odds against her

Duane Bartlett
Drew Hudgins
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let-them-fly's Avatar

Harry – It is true that many have found success after many rejections, and to simply toss it based on a rejection would be thoughtless, however, that was/is not the moral of this “story” (thread)……. this thread pertains to those who fully expect to be successful even though they ignore the basics (research, marketability, practicality, cost) of inventing and the REALITY of licensing; who in fact become ANGRY and take it as a personal INSULT when their “baby” is rejected DUE to one or more of the above reasons.

They do not take into consideration someone else may have invented a similar/BETTER solution long before them… instead, they become angry and accuse someone of stealing their idea once they find out.

They never bother to even perform a basic Google Search of their idea, let alone anything deeper, before convincing themselves it’s a million dollar idea (and in many cases, spend thousands and thousands of dollars developing it)

Due to the encouragement of family and friends (and unscrupulous invention submission companies), they spend THOUSANDS on a patent, then are totally dismayed when they discover it’s not even barely marketable.

Due to grossly unrealistic expectations and impatience, they pester the one’s who are sincerely attempting to help them to the point of rejection JUST to hush them up!

THESE are the ones this thread is about, not those with viable, researched, useful inventions that haven’t found a home.

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1cheleno's Avatar

Hi Frank, Ya I understand what you are saying.. I guess I just don’t know anyone with an idea like you describe who refuses to embrace reality. having said that I have plenty of naysayers in my personal invention space. I just do not want a dose from my partner no matter how insignificant.

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tesladog's Avatargold

But I’m sure this “wheel” thing I just invented will be a huge hit! You’re definitely off the guest list for my big success party. So there! That’s what you get for being such a gloomy gus, Roger.

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let-them-fly's Avatar

Harry – Read the forums… it is speckled with those who are in shock because
EN/Sponsor would pass on their $1m invention!
Some of the biggest blow-outs in the forums are a direct result of an inventor
with unrealistic expectations….. it’s like I’ve always said, this experience would
be a LOT gentler if the idea was viewed as “just another kid”, instead of the most
“adorable, cutest, precious, immaculate, destined-for-greatness baby” that ever
drew breath!

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1cheleno's Avatar

Ya Frank I’ve seen some of the posts in this forum. That guy Luis came to mind again. I decided to contribute to this forum solely because I felt it strange to have one’s partner start it in the first place. If anything we’ve revived a forum that is 3 years old. Maybe its just me but I’d rather have E N find a way to wean out those crazy ideas quickly. That way they can free up the pipeline and possibly streamline the whole process. Probably not something easily accomplished because E N is too diplomatic.

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let-them-fly's Avatar

Yes, it may be three years old, but the lessons it brings are just as applicable today
as they were 30 years ago, and as they will be 30 years from now.
When these lessons are ignored or overlooked (the “basics” not followed),
THAT’S where the craziness begins!

Maybe instead of wishing and waiting for EN to “wean out” the craziness, we strive
to set a better example and to better EDUCATE the new arrivals so they are not caught
up in the stereotypes and pie-in-the-sky fantasies that destroy so many, thus efficiently
streamlining the process from the inside. (ie: so the craziness never gets a foothold)

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pegman's Avatar

When Roger started doing a lot of posts like this, it was almost as though he had a chip on his shoulder and was defending the viewpoint of the manufacturer and not the inventor. I think there was probably something going on, and that a post like this was a way to defend himself (or perhaps a business entity that he conferred with) from the ranting or hostilities of an inventor. He does have the ability to see it from both angles, but there was a time that he definitely was trying to put the inventor in his place. He could have presented it differently to help, but sometimes helping needs to be blunt.

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let-them-fly's Avatar

Scott – I remember Roger talking about not only the volume of inventors
he communicates with daily (averaging 35 to 45 emails/day) asking for
feedback on their inventions or help/guidance on how to deal with companies,
but also daily interaction with companies about licensing matters, so it has
to be with both perspectives in mind as you said.

It would seem that hearing the complaints/issues voiced by the companies would
be a LOT more insightful to the independent inventor than the complaints voiced
from fellow Inventors?
Companies are the ones the Inventors are trying to get to license their
product….. If the company forms a bad taste for the independent Inventor due to a
small group that are nuts and are being unrealistic (like they do in here sometimes),
it in turn reflects on ALL independent inventors….. the few “bad” ones have ruined
it for the majority of good ones.

It’s a simple lesson that if heeded, could short-circuit the entire “craziness” system
which is getting Inventors to do the “Basics” BEFORE approaching a company!
Doing this not only increases their chances of success when dealing with a company
on their own, but it ALSO serves to decrease the number of “Red X’s” they get
during LPS submissions!

The message may be a bit “blunt”, but personally, the NON-sugarcoated version
will be more beneficial in the long run, and besides, anyone would have a difficult time
disproving the results of doing a thorough job on the BASICS…. and that’s what
counts in the end, right?

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1cheleno's Avatar

FRANK I agree that guy Roger Brown must be bombarded with calls from inventors. I’d hate to be the one having to respond. Personally I returned the call of an E N staff member once , left my message and never got a returned call. So if Mr. Brown returns calls, that’s a plus. SCOTT I think Mr. Brown as you infer, may have been venting. I get all what Frank has said I just want a positive spin from my partner.Would you want your physician to post all the reasons you may die on the operating table.

“Just because you only had an appendectomy doesn’t mean your heart won’t give out!”
“Just because you made it out of the operating room doesn’t mean you won’t contract a serious infection while here”
“Just because your surgery went as planned doesn’t mean you’ll recover”

You don’t want to hear this type of rhetoric from your doctor. You want your doctor to be positive and not highlight the negative

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pegman's Avatar

Agreed Frank.

My history began and then progressed, in sequence, as: inventor,machine operator, engineering student, fabricator, engineer, inventor, product developer, fabricator and now soloprenuer with a lot of back and forth during different phases.

But, as an inventor on this forum, I’m going to assume that every inventor is my peer and can not divulge their idea. That their idea actually is a legitimate idea with great potential. That they have a level head but simply don’t have, or any access to, the resources to bring their idea to market.

Roger was a resource here, for some time, that offered experience. But, on more than one occasion, he would share an opinion that made it sound as though his opinion actually mattered. I never shared my opinion on some of his inventions, but he didn’t have a problem sharing his opinion about others’ inventions.

Every idea is based on the fact that there might be a market for it, that is why it was invented to begin with. The quality of the idea can not be determined in this format, nor should it be. But to give every inventor the opportunity to pursue his dream should be our goal, and to offer that form of encouragement can be encouraged in this forum.

The real world will beat up even the best of ideas and their inventors, I don’t see any need to do that. I’d rather offer the the courage to dust themselves off, and if they’re willing to try again, offer the encouragement to do so.

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speedbump's Avatar

No disrespect to Roger as I’m sure he was just having a bad day and needed to vent when this post was made. The list probably wasn’t intended to be offensive in any way but it also doesn’t look like something that would be listed as a motivational topic for someone wanting to solicit submissions. . I actually don’t know what Roger does for the EN team but it would appear that his job might be to separate the wheat from the chaff and I wouldn’t think a company would have any direct contact with the inventor to get a negative impression of them f they use EN. The same release used by Mr. Brown should be afforded to all inventors who come here and have their side of the story to express if they keep things civil. There’s nothing wrong with venting and there’s no way this a forum can police each others submissions as we don’t have a clue what someone else has in mind. The whole process is somewhat subjective.

If the 12 points Roger mentioned were used as criteria for submissions (which I know they weren’t intended to be) then EN might not have had “Eggies” nor “The Gyro-Bowl” or many other success storys to tell. After reading about both the inventors… Betsy and The Shepards…. they didn’t have any inkling as to how big of success they would end up being. I’m sure all 12 of the points made were all doubts they had at some point. The new guy should be encouraged to ask all the same questions that some have heard many many times …. it’s part of the process and who knows they just might have that next big thing

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chriscam8's Avatargold

People need to realize some things here;

1.) This post was made by Roger 3 years ago, when he was an independent inventor and way BEFORE he was hired by Edison Nation. This wasn’t about submitting to EN………it was about inventing and the mindset, expectations, and reality.

2.) Roger was not trying to crush dreams here. He was just making the point that inventing is a ruthless business. You should not develop an idea and go into this thing blindly. Learn as much as possible about the invention process (provisional patents, patent searches, market research, NDA’s, sale sheets ect.) before making huge risks. Developing “drawings on a napkin” and submitting to EN for 20 bucks is one thing……………………but when people mortgage their homes, take out large loans, risk their kids college funds, ect………………….on product ideas when they haven’t completed any research…………well that is just crazy. Don’t throw out thousands of dollars to “product submission” companies who claim they could “make your dreams come true”.

3.) You just have to be intelligent about this and do your research. Don’t get obsessed with any one idea. If you are going to take a product to the market on your own, be wise about it. Someone like Scott Thieman is a great example. He took his own product idea and made it a reality. He invested a lot of time and finances……………..but he also educated himself on the process a long the way.

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pegman's Avatar

Chris, Thank you. You bring up a good point I hadn’t thought about really. I got some education before I began. Learned a little more before I jumped in both feet. But the real schooling began, painfully, after I began being an entrepreneur. I did try the easy way out, that didn’t work for me. Kinda glad now, I’m happy with the direction I’m going.

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let-them-fly's Avatar

Nail on the head, Chris, thanks!
And as you eluded, if anyone doubts the validity of the “inventing is a ruthless business” assertion, feel free to asked Scott Thieman how ruthless the real world can be.

“Positive Spins” are great, Harry, but the fact is, Companies don’t care about your feelings; they want to make money and if they determine your product is not going to do that, OR, they get tired of taking all the “when can I expect to hear something/how long is this going to take/let me know who you’re talking to, etc etc etc” questions, they will pass on it and never look back.

In fact, it is generally too many “positive spins” that brings on the feeling of “entitlement” or “invincibility” to begin with…

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1cheleno's Avatar

Well indeed if Mr. Brown was not an E N employee at the time this forum was posted then all bets are off, its a game changer. That makes more sense now because had he been an E N staff member he wouldn’t have posted this subject the way he did. At least that’s how I see it, thanks Chris for the clarification.

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speedbump's Avatar

The message is still the same but it’s good to know that Roger wasn’t gainfully employed by EN at the time of his posting. There are many truths in his and others statements concerning “just because You” that would bear listing … maybe with a little different wording so as not to seem as harsh. I find blunt replies to be insensitive and counter productive in general conversation. The original list appears to be a somewhat tongue in cheek post from the beginning.

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reznil's Avatargold

I think the fact that Roger was not an EN employee when he wrote it makes it more interesting, the content is refreshingly honest. Each one of his points are objectively true, you must admit.

I do not think it was meant to demotivate or demoralize anyone, just a reminder to take a deep breath and keep yourself centered.

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williamj's Avatargold

The underlying feeling I’m getting here (and from other threads) is that people are taking umbrage from decisions and critiques of their ideas made from a purely professional point of view. This is a very insensitive area of business we have chosen to involve ourselves in.

Decisions and critiques are given on a dollar per given effort basis only. Though I can’t imagine a professional going out of their way to be unduly critical or abusive, although comments and decisions are too often received in such a manner. The truth is that most honest decisions and comment are factual and unfeeling in nature. There is (or must be) an art to breaking unpleasant news but I have never found the talent to perform any such works of art.

It is an unpleasant fact that the nature of the business we are in (inventing) is brutal at best and (unintentionally) demeaning at worst.

I think that’s gotta make some sense to someone somewhere.

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let-them-fly's Avatar

Absolutely, David and William; sound, straight forward (so there’s no misunderstandings) advice like this IS the proverbial “survival kit” in this industry.
And, the only thing “harsh” about it is the crash that will ensue if the “Basics” are ignored or sugarcoated over (so it feels better)… in fact, there exist a good (and rather convenient) example in the recent post in this thread of how a misinterpretation of a business relationship can lead to tainted observations;

Harry; several times you elude to EN (Roger Brown being a representative of) as being your “Partner”, which explains why you would digest the post as negative “rhetoric”, but plainly spelled out in the Edison Nation (Insider Licensing Program) Innovator Agreement
Section 6. “Miscellaneous Provisions”, Paragraph 6. “Relationship of the Parties” it states:
“Nothing contained in this Agreement shall be deemed or construed as creating an agency, joint venture, partnership, or franchise relationship between the Parties.”

So Roger’s employment status does not enter in to it; it’s solid, sound advise coming straight from the hip of one who not only strives to get our products licensed here at EN, but who has also dealt with companies on his own and has NINE (9) licensed products on the market as a result of those dealings!

NINE…. hey, I don’t know about you, but I’m going to listen to what he has to say HOWEVER he chooses to say it because obviously he knows what he’s talking about.

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cowbell's Avatarg8_badge

Amen to that Frank!

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1cheleno's Avatar

Frank yes I read that part of the contract rhetoric put together by attorneys on behalf of EN. What it all boils down to is EN is intervening on my behalf. If successful they are entitled to 50% of my earnings. It is this royalty agreement also in the contract that I base my “partner” reference to. Any way we may spin it, they are an active participant. There is no other way to look at it, One of my ideas is currently in the hands of a large corporation. I was never able to interest them, E N did!. Maybe the word “partner” was just a euphemism on my part. It may have been too strong a word for this “relationship” between us.

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pegman's Avatar

William,
The best way I’ve found to present, not an opinion, but “advice” indirectly is to simply share experience. Sharing your own experience by saying “to envision it in every home, means that I had to, or may have to, create the marketing material to share that vision. I also need to investigate every thing from manufacturing and packaging to sales and distribution to make it possible”.

So, number one goes from essentially saying “go back to your corner and put the dunce cap on.” to saying “are you ready to sit down at your desk and roll up your sleeves?”

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speedbump's Avatar

My view of the 12 points didn’t have anything to do with giving sound advice or critique in anyway. I don’t see William’s or David’s posts as being anything except helpful and well thought out. My problem is still with tone in which t’s written…………..

Here’s another convenient example…..If I say Rogers advice stated above had lots of merit although I just think the tone he used made him sound like a condescending _______! You’ll have to fill in the blank. I think some might find fault with my choice of words as being a little to harsh. I could have stated this differently and still got my point across but decided to use the blunt version. Spin it however you like but being blunt goes both ways and usually isn’t received as well as trying to be somewhat tactful.

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bobf's Avatargold

Roger has spent countless hours reviewing ideas for others at no charge, and many of those ideators lost their cool towards his evaluations simply because they identify compulsively with their ideas. I feel the post above is directed towards those that are insecure and is simply a reality check. Those guideline suggestions are not directed at anyone’s specific idea, so if you feel animosity, its probably comes from the insecurity that stems from identifying a product with self worth.

Your idea is not great just because you stayed at the Holiday Inn Express. LOL

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williamj's Avatargold

Oh Nooo Robert!!! Please say it ain’t so!!! Ya mean I gotta switch to Ramada?!?!

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bobf's Avatargold

None of them have helped my ideas William. LOL

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